Writing and Migraine

Headache by Erika

 

I wasn’t sure if I should be blogging about this, then I decided to go ahead and do it.

I haven’t blogged for ages because I just haven’t found the energy. It’s been hard to find the energy to write my novel or anything else.

Writing was easier years ago when I was on caffeine. Lots of caffeine to keep headaches at bay. Then I had more and more headaches and drank more and more caffeine and took Excedrin, eventually ending in rebound. Had to stop the caffeine altogether. Had to stop all sorts of pain medication because of rebound.

Now I am on the drug topiramate or topamax. It sort of works, the only thing that sort of works. Except for what it does to my memory and what is called “foggy brain syndrome.” Imagine trying to write with that problem.

There are more of us out there than ever—what are now called “migraineurs.” We even have our own site, Migraine.com, where we can commiserate with one another and learn about the latest advances in headache medicine. Some of you who are reading this may be one of us.

I will keep writing. I get depressed if I don’t. It just takes three times longer to get a chapter written than it used to: “I know that word, what is it? Why can’t I recall the name of that place? Describing such a scene used to come to me so easily.”

Blogging? Yeah, I ought to be blogging at least once a week. Ha.

See you, well, whenever.

 

Push

Push, courtesy of Michael at Flicker, Creative Commons

Push, courtesy of Michael at Flicker, Creative Commons

It’s hard some days, isn’t it? To make yourself do what you don’t feel like doing. You know you must, you should, deep down you really want to, but the push isn’t there. Maybe you haven’t had your caffeine yet, or the brew isn’t doing the job.

Writing is like that some days, even writing this post. I don’t have the benefit of caffeine, ever, and I am basically a Type B person, a dreamer more than a doer. But to make those dreams happen, I got to push. We all have to push sometimes, to get what we want.

There is always something in the way.

The cat puked on the carpet, usually-sweet little Tommy dumped his Cream of Wheat all over the kitchen floor and your car battery went dead. Nevertheless, that presentation you haven’t prepared yet is due at 2:00 p.m.

Sound like one of those silly movies? They make those movies because nearly everyone can identify with them.

You don’t have to be perfect, either. Who told you you did? Your mom? Your pop? Yourself? Do you even know a perfect person? A perfect mom? A perfect dad? Do you like them?

Life is constant challenges, ups and downs. As Kristen Lamb says, “This is life. Focus on your love and passion, but also be fearless with yourself. We all procrastinate, make excuses, hide, or deflect. We are human. A pro takes problems seriously, the amateur takes them personally.

Check out Kristen Lamb’s blog. She focuses on writers, but what she has to say applies to everyone, and she says it much better than I do.

 

 

A Loss for Words?

 

Photo by Alie Krohn, Photostream Creative Commons

Photo by Alie Krohn, Photostream Creative Commons

“What the hell kind of people read books about words?”

I love this. I took it from a interview with one of my favorite people who is also an author and a word wizard, Arthur Plotnik. I don’t know of anyone who makes reading about words, or how to “write words better” so much fun.

I don’t know what I would do without his book, Spunk & Bite. Mine looks a bit like a squished porcupine with all the tabs I have added for quick access to all the info.

Take a look at the interview on The Grammarist, if you’ve a mind, and you will not only learn something, but I bet you will smile doing it: http://grammarist.com/nofront/interview-with-arthur-plotnik/

 

What’s Your Preferred Writing Aid?

Latte Machiatto

Latte Machiatto (Photo credit: 5.0OG)

My best writing time is first thing in the morning—before any pedestrian concerns of the coming day enter and destroy my dreamspace. A hot cup of tea or a foamy latte and mood music for the scene helps. I even have an iTunes playlist entitled, “Angst” for those special scenes—for example: my protag has lost her temper and accused the boy she loves of cowardice.

I used to get the greatest writing buzz while drinking green tea or a latte, but that’s gone since I’ve discovered the rebound from caffeine gives me headaches. No caffeine has made writing much more difficult. I’m writing this after finishing a cup of no-caffeine mint tea, and I feel like I’m pulling teeth from a submerged hippo.

Many writers, like Hemingway, used alcohol, but I have the same problem with tequila I have with lattes. I love it, but it hates me.

Do you write with a caffeine buzz? What about that steamed milk foam on your upper lip?