Tucson Book Frost

Yum

Yum

I escaped the Colorado Cold and flew to Arizona for two fantastic days at the Tucson Festival of Books and, besides perusing the numerous tents full of authors and books, attended, let’s see, about eight workshops full of information about social media, publishing, marketing and speech-making. I got to listen to and meet two of my favorite bloggers, Chuck Wendig and Kristen Lamb! Now that I’ve met them, maybe I’ll be able to get them each to do a guest blog here. Are you reading this, you guys?

Besides getting an education and being able to buy wonderful books at half price, this Festival manages to have yummy food vendors. I was there with my best friend from first grade (we are book lovers from way back), and we spied one of our most favorite foods in the whole world—Frost gelato! If you haven’t had Frost gelato, you are missing out on one of the great wonders of the world. This stuff is better than ice cream. Not only does it come in flavors one can hardly imagine, like tiramisu and Bailey’s cream vanilla, but it is lower in calories and fat than ice cream. But I’ll dare you to notice. This stuff is so rich and creamy. My favorite is sea salt caramel.

How sad a person can’t get Frost everywhere. Although I discovered it is now in Albuquerque and Chicago, and there are lots of franchises in the Middle East. Wouldn’t you know. By the way, I do not own a Frost Franchise nor do I know anyone who does. I just love it. I must have inherited the ice cream gene from my mom.

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The Author – An Anachronism?

A web friend of mine recently published her first book – an eBook.  She is thrilled.  I would be, too.  She also has a very fun blog that interviews her characters.  This is not only clever, but shows she is aware of one of the most current methods of marketing her book.

One of the recent articles on Digital Book World is by Don Linn, former owner/CEO of Consortium Book Sales & Distribution, entitled, “Caught in the Middle, Publishing’s Other Customers.”

The cost of hardcover books is going down.  Sounds like a good deal, doesn’t it.  It is for the reader, which I suspect applies to most of us.  He notes that authors like Stephen King will not suffer.  They and those like them can self-publish and will still sell the same number of books they always have.  Even us newbies may do all right, as long as we do not seek to make a living from our writing.  I add, as long as we are willing and able to do all of our own marketing, delivery, follow-up etc., etc.

What about “those who fall between these two groups. They are the people who write for a living and who bring us the workhorse books in their categories (from literary fiction to genre fiction to all manner of non-fiction). Their advances have historically been relatively low and their sales relatively modest. They write for major publishers and independents. They write books that backlist and, in a small but very important number, they write really important books that either break out commercially, or say something significant that might not otherwise get said.”

Yet another consideration in this age of transitions.  Will the future look back on us and declare we produced nothing new, nothing of worth?  For the lack of funds, art suffered?  No more authors, only people who “write on the side.”

You may want to check out his article.  More food for thought.